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Why does it seem like the gaming industry is more in touch with fans than the movie industry

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With movies these days, It seems the majority of high-profile blockbuster franchise movies like Jurassic World TFK and Fantastic Beast TCOG, seem to either fall flat or at best seen as average, only gaining money because of franchise recognition with the exception of many Disney movies, and even then they have their vocal haters. However, things seem to be different with the game industry, with franchises like God of War, Mario and Zelda, both finding much more success with both critics and fans alike, with some even praising the latest entries as the best in their respective series, instead of complaining that the old ones were better. While there are a handful of nasty companies right now like EA and Activision, the good companies seems to do real well in understanding how to make quality and please fans, at least much better than the movie industry. Why does it appear that there is such a stark contrast of quality between the two entertainment industries?

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There's successes and failures abound in both industries and some of the criticisms you have exist in both if you think about it long enough.  I mean there are plenty of times where the latest entry in a long running franchise may sell well on the back of the name and history behind it but not turn out nearly as well as previous titles which causes people to reminisce on "better times" so to speak.  If this were the Gamecube era, Super Mario Sunshine would be Nintendo's Jurassic World Fallen Kingdom.  It's not a bad experience, but it's also not the experience many expected following its predecessor Super Mario 64. (Mind you, I adored Super Mario Sunshine, I never really got the disdain some had for it)

 

Ultimately, it just really depends on how you're framing that particular contrast.  Look around a few release lists over the years and  you'll see that most games released in a calendar year aren't that great either.

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ah yes. battlefront ii. the pinnacle of game industry being in touch with fans.

 

tbh, it feels about the same. Like, the Sonic movie seems completely out of touch and I still don't understand who's interested in the live action Disney remakes, but you have stuff like Star Wars and MCU that are doing really well. And while Nintendo and Sony studios have made great strides, you have your looter shooter #3146.

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7 hours ago, Pichi said:

no idea what world you live in lol. both industries pump out garbage like it's their life support

 

 

Yeah...

 

I mean both industries are trying to crank out franchise for sequels to make even more money.  Both really seem to also be really working the spin off angle as well from popular movies.  And really, not much coming is breaking new ground.

 

And it seems video games in general are trying to recapture that nostalgia feel of the 16 bit era instead of moving forward as much as it seems movies are trying to go back to old formulas and looks as well.

 

That said, the barriers to entry are quite different:  $7-13 for a move vs. $50-60 for a video game though....  It is a little cheaper to experiment on checking new movies out.

 

 

What is kind of killing  me on the movie front though, is that at the current cost it is to go, what is actually worth it?  I've seen very little outside the blockbuster action/sci fi movie genre to entice me to fork out for a regular price movie ticket.  I think the last comedy I paid to see was Ted 2 LOL.  That said, IT, Chappaquiddick, and Pet Sematary were pretty legit non-action/sci fi movies.

 

As far as video game hate goes, why does it seem like every new game coming out need some sort of day 1 or first month release window patch to fix issues with the game?  I mean damn, does anyone quality test their games anymore?  Didn't they QA the game before they released it?  I mean they did have it running on actual hardware before release right?  It shouldn't need fixing that soon IMO.

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Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, purple_beard said:

As far as video game hate goes, why does it seem like every new game coming out need some sort of day 1 or first month release window patch to fix issues with the game?  I mean damn, does anyone quality test their games anymore?  Didn't they QA the game before they released it?  I mean they did have it running on actual hardware before release right?  It shouldn't need fixing that soon IMO.

nope, deadlines are absolute in the world of patches. anything game-breaking can be fixed later with a complementary reward so you can be sure players will forget about it in a month. or if you go the bethesda route, never fix your games and just let modders do it lmao

Edited by Pichi

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Personally, the movie industry has me more interested in what's coming than gaming. Gaming has the issue of price and quantity that the movie industry does not have, and as interactive entertainment gaming just requires more time investment. Games for me these days need to either really get me with the fan service or be very stacked experiences while maintaining a great level of quality. Generally, movies just have to entertain me for 1.5-2.5 hours and at least be all right in bringing me into their story. Both industries are progressing in terms of what can be done, but I don't feel like gaming has improved as much with more as an interactive entertainment as films have as visual/audio entertainment. For example, how many Power Stars in Super Mario 64 could be obtained by a single Ground Pound versus Power Moons in Super Mario Odyssey? I would argue that what SM64 does with 120 stars is equal with if not more than what Odyssey does with its ~999 moons. With film, I would say Iron Man to End Game is a considerable leap in terms of what's being done on screen. 

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2 hours ago, IU said:

Personally, the movie industry has me more interested in what's coming than gaming. Gaming has the issue of price and quantity that the movie industry does not have, and as interactive entertainment gaming just requires more time investment. Games for me these days need to either really get me with the fan service or be very stacked experiences while maintaining a great level of quality. Generally, movies just have to entertain me for 1.5-2.5 hours and at least be all right in bringing me into their story. Both industries are progressing in terms of what can be done, but I don't feel like gaming has improved as much with more as an interactive entertainment as films have as visual/audio entertainment. For example, how many Power Stars in Super Mario 64 could be obtained by a single Ground Pound versus Power Moons in Super Mario Odyssey? I would argue that what SM64 does with 120 stars is equal with if not more than what Odyssey does with its ~999 moons. With film, I would say Iron Man to End Game is a considerable leap in terms of what's being done on screen. 

 

That time investment is just an assumed part of the experiences and ideally is a necessary one to convey the intended experience.  Metroid Prime probably wouldn't have been nearly as well received if Retro had to chop out everything and cram what they could and still tell their story in 1.5-2.5 hours.  There's a very different experience involved when you have a movie that is framing the experience for a specific duration of time compared to a game where that experience is driven by your own time investment.  A movie that ends at 1.5 hours will always end at 1.5 hours and every time you watch it you are experiencing the same 1.5 hours of media.  Play a game from start to finish multiple times and you're likely to get very different results each time. But I get it, that time investment is a potential problem point because we don't always have the time to give to playing games, especially if they end up not so great.  It's one thing to blow off a 1.5 movie that turns out average but it leaves a sour taste in your mouth if you were to invest 10-15 hours in an average game.  Even a good game that requires more time investment is hard to swallow simply because it's a heavier investment.  Took me over 100+ hours to see the end credits of Xenoblade 2, loved every minute of it and I still have tons left to do in this game.  I've seen people with time counts as high as 500+ hours.  But that 100+ hours was over a couple of months of off and on playing; so I get how the time investment can be a problem.

 

But as mentioned that time investment is just part of the experience and probably isn't the kind of thing that can be corrected without telling a truncated story or building a gameplay model that serves the story more than it does the experience of playing the game.

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5 hours ago, Kezay said:

 

That time investment is just an assumed part of the experiences and ideally is a necessary one to convey the intended experience.  Metroid Prime probably wouldn't have been nearly as well received if Retro had to chop out everything and cram what they could and still tell their story in 1.5-2.5 hours.  There's a very different experience involved when you have a movie that is framing the experience for a specific duration of time compared to a game where that experience is driven by your own time investment.  A movie that ends at 1.5 hours will always end at 1.5 hours and every time you watch it you are experiencing the same 1.5 hours of media.  Play a game from start to finish multiple times and you're likely to get very different results each time. But I get it, that time investment is a potential problem point because we don't always have the time to give to playing games, especially if they end up not so great.  It's one thing to blow off a 1.5 movie that turns out average but it leaves a sour taste in your mouth if you were to invest 10-15 hours in an average game.  Even a good game that requires more time investment is hard to swallow simply because it's a heavier investment.  Took me over 100+ hours to see the end credits of Xenoblade 2, loved every minute of it and I still have tons left to do in this game.  I've seen people with time counts as high as 500+ hours.  But that 100+ hours was over a couple of months of off and on playing; so I get how the time investment can be a problem.

 

But as mentioned that time investment is just part of the experience and probably isn't the kind of thing that can be corrected without telling a truncated story or building a gameplay model that serves the story more than it does the experience of playing the game.

 

I was just speaking on my interest between the two. I'm not very willing to try out new game releases unless they are high in quality, stacked in content and personally appeal to me because of the time gaming needs, and I'm find investing hundreds of hours into a single game if it checks those boxes. Movies don't have to meet as high of an expectation for me personally in comparison, and since they require around 2.5 hours or less of my time, I'm more willing to check out what's new in theaters week to week or month to month than I would be gaming: Movies are easier to explore. If I go out to a theater, I know I'm pretty much only getting a handful of new to recent releases at any time. They don't have to compete for my time against older releases or a ton of new releases there, and that's just the benefit of that industry versus the vast amount of content each new game has to compete with. 

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