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Found 79 results

  1. Chrom

    Fire Emblem Heroes

    https://fire-emblem-heroes.com/ The battle goes mobile with Fire Emblem Heroes, Nintendo's hit strategy RPG series reimagined for smart devices. Use this topic for general discussion of the game. Share your impressions, questions, strategies, teams, hero summons, or whatever else. Trailer Heroes and Heroines (part 1, part 2) A brand-new, original Fire Emblem story takes place in the world of Zenith, and you've been summoned to battle. The Emblian Empire seeks to conquer all worlds, while the Askran Kingdom stands against them. Together with Prince Alfonse and Princess Sharena of Askr, you play the role of a summoner who can call upon legendary heroes from other Fire Emblem worlds as your allies, and enlist in the Order of Heroes to aid them in this endless war. Battles are played in traditional Fire Emblem fashion that will appeal to veterans and newcomers alike, and completing tasks nets you rewards that you can use to unlock the potential of your allies, or recruit new ones. Collect your favorites and build your very own army of legends. Fire Emblem Heroes arrives on iOS and Android as a free-to-start game (with in-app purchases for gameplay incentives) on February 2nd, and will see long-term content updates to the game, including new characters, events, and other features.
  2. Tyranogre

    A hypothetical FE4 remake

    After successfully introducing Zora to Genealogy, coupled with the recent banner in Heroes, I've had Jugdral on the mind a lot lately, and what a hypothetical remake could be like. Before I begin, there's a great video by Zerk Monster Hunter that lays down some of the basics. I recommend you give that a watch before reading on. Now, the biggest challenge with a localization is one that is only vaguely alluded to in ZMH's video: the fact that the story features incest as an important plot point. No, I'm not talking heavy subtext like Eirika x Ephraim, nor first-cousin marriage like Azura x MaCorrin. If it weren’t for literal, blood-related, brother-sister incest, the game wouldn’t have a final boss. And that's not even the darkest subject matter, either. The story also features: *Political corruption *Genocide *Religious persecution *Child sacrifices to a Satanic figure *Rape *NTR ...among other things. While some of these topics have been involved in previous Fire Emblem games like Sacred Stones or the Tellius saga, they were mostly kept off-screen or alluded to in support conversations. In FE4, however, these themes are much more important to the plot, and if they were removed, the narrative would greatly suffer for it. Now, I don't want to start an argument about face-petting or vagina bones, but for the sake of the storyline, it's imperative that Treehouse not lay a grubby finger on this game. Even if it means garnering an M rating. Now that that's out of the way, let's talk about the gameplay. While FE4's storyline is rightfully lauded as the best the series has ever gotten, the gameplay, to put it kindly, hasn't aged quite as well. For every revolutionary game mechanic that became a series staple, there are an equal number of dumb decisions that were never seen again. There are quite a few features from modern Fire Emblem games that FE4 could greatly benefit from, such as: *Support conversations. The most important part of the metagame is deciding which characters in the first generation you want to pair together so that their offspring can participate in the second generation. However, the way this works leaves much to be desired: Just like the GBA games, support points are gained by having the units stand next to each other. But the key difference here is that in the GBA games, you must activate the support conversations manually, which renders it impossible to accidentally pair two characters together that you didn't want to. But in FE4, while there are still conversations that are manually triggered, the majority of the "love points" required to pair two units together are gained automatically. If you're not careful, you may accidentally end up pairing one of your Cavaliers with Ferry the Pegasus Knight, simply because their similar movement ranges make them the most likely to end their turns next to her. On top of that, only a select few pairings can even have conversations. For others, they can potentially fuck without ever speaking a word to each other. Therefore, locking the love growths behind conversations not only gives more control to the player over who they want to pair up, but it also ensures that the marriage actually makes sense in-story, as there would have to be a support chain written for every possible pairing. While Awakening and Fates were criticized for having the majority of the romantic support conversations seem contrived, Genealogy's much smaller cast would make this much less of an issue. Another problem with the conversations as they exist in FE4 is that certain valuable weapons are locked behind them. Ayra’s Brave Sword, for example, is only available by talking to Lex or Holyn, which gives a significant boost to their love points that makes it risky if you want to pair her with somebody else. This issue could also be resolved by, for example, giving Ayra the Brave Sword upon reaching a B-Support with Lex or Holyn, so that way it’s safer to have them talk to each other if you want to pair them with other units. *Pair-up. Long before the arena in Heroes, "Horse Emblem" was a common nickname for FE4 itself, as the massive, sprawling maps favored cavalry to the point that unmounted soldiers were easily left behind. With the pair-up mechanic introduced in Awakening, this issue would solve itself. Coupled with the above, it would also make it easier for first-gen units to fall in love without having to cuck each other. Alternately, if Pair-up is too overpowered, they could simply re-introduce the Rescue mechanic, fittingly introduced in FE4’s midquel. *Reclassing. As mentioned above, inheritance plays a major role in the metagame. However, unlike Awakening and Fates, where everyone except the main lord and Avatar can only produce a single child, every pairing in FE4 produces two children. As a result, many potential fathers tend to greatly benefit one of their potential children, while completely fucking over the other. For example, Azel x Adean results in a great Lana who can fight and heal equally well, but a useless Lester with no way to take advantage of his Mag stat due to being locked to Bows. On top of that, it is entirely possible for certain child units to inherit a Holy Weapon that they can’t use due to class restrictions, while their sibling can’t wield it due to lack of Holy Blood. Therefore, with the Reclass option introduced in Shadow Dragon, they could provide better options to second-gen units with unusual fathers. As a bonus, this could also resolve the aforementioned Horse Emblem issue, either by allowing infantry units to reclass into Cavalry, or vice-versa. However, one possible issue I could see happening is that there are certain scripted story events that could potentially be messed up depending on the player’s reclass options. The Yied Massacre, for example, heavily relies on the fact that Quan and Ethlyn are horseback units attempting to cross the desert, only to be ambushed by Wyvern Knights. A savvy player could attempt to circumvent this by reclassing them into Snipers or Sages before they left the party in Chapter 4. So, now that we’ve gone over what new things modern Fire Emblem games could bring to FE4, another problem is the possibility that IS might decide to do a remake that’s too faithful to the original. Echoes and the DS games both went about remaking their respective games in completely different ways: Archanea remakes: “The original games had a lot of stupid mechanics that people hated.” “Okay, then. Let’s get rid of them and replace them with features that people will actually like.” Gaiden remake: “The original game had a lot of stupid mechanics that people hated.” “I know! That’s what made it great! Let’s bring them back!” Make no mistake: Echoes had some of the best presentation the series has ever seen. Characters with less than a single line of dialogue in the original became much more compelling. New characters like Conrad and Berkut fleshed out the storyline without completely derailing it. And the Memory Fragments scattered throughout the game allowed us to actually see storyline events that were only vaguely alluded to in the original, such as the fall of Zofia, or Rudolf’s gambit. The gameplay, however, is largely the same broken mess that it was on the Famicom: Magic cast from HP, overpowered Dread Fighters and Falcoknights, only a single inventory slot per unit, etc. It also added a few even dumber mechanics, such as the Fatigue system, or reclassing being locked behind a limited-quantity DLC item. So, if they were to remake FE4, what features from the original game would they bring back for the sake of being faithful to the original, even if later games in the series were better off without them? The game’s huge maps, for one, you could argue as part of the game’s charm, as each “chapter” is about as grand in scale as roughly 3-4 chapters in other games. Likewise, the repairable weapon mechanic is a nice compromise between encouraging the player to actually use their weapons, and Fates’ approach of inflicting heavy stat penalties upon every weapon stronger than Iron. The convoluted inventory system, on the other hand, I could live without. Instead of a simple “trade” command, each unit has their own personal funds, and the only way to transfer weapons between units is to have one unit sell an item to the Pawn Shop, then have another unit buy it for twice the price. Not only does it necessitate constant backtracking to the nearest castle every time a random mook drops a weapon, but it also greatly imbalances the game because some units have a much more difficult time acquiring Gold than others. Lovers can freely give their Gold to each other, and Thieves can give Gold directly to other units, but there are two main problems with this: 1. You only get one Thief per generation. 2. You can’t manually select how much Gold to give to the other unit; either you dump your entire wallet, or however much the other unit can carry. So, if they were to insist on bringing back the inventory system, it would need a drastic overhaul. At the very least, I’d imagine that they could make it somewhat more bearable by enabling units to sell items directly to each other without having to backtrack to the Pawn Shop. But if there’s one feature from Echoes that FE4 could definitely benefit from, it’s the presentation. A good chunk of the characters’ backstories are only vaguely alluded to in-game, which could be further expanded upon with Memory Fragments. On top of that, IS could also take advantage of the presentation to mess with the player’s expectations. Both Echoes and Awakening begin with a cutscene that takes place much later in the game, depicting a main character dying. This gives the player a sense of dread as they get closer and closer to that point in the story, only to subvert it at the end by having that character not actually die. Well, what if an FE4 remake did the opposite? Start the game with a cutscene of Sigurd triumphantly returning to Grannvale, welcomed by cheering crowds. Then, when you finally play up to that point… It could also go the BSFE route of giving us a few optional side-chapters taking place in the world’s past. Perhaps a map where you control Ishtar trying to secretly sabotage the Child Hunts without getting caught by Julius? Or one where you play as the Twelve Crusaders during the Miracle of Darna? So, what do YOU want from an FE4 remake? Or what should they avoid?
  3. https://fecipher.jp/ The Fire Emblem Cipher Trading Card Game (TCG) is a collectible card game based on the Fire Emblem series by Nintendo and Intelligent Systems. Though it has only been available in Japan and there's no word on an official English release, it is regularly updated with new sets and rules which keep it interesting for fans to talk about. Series 14 is the upcoming expansion releasing on September 27, and will include one new booster pack featuring characters from the titles Awakening, Path of Radiance, Radiant Dawn, Birthright, and Tokyo Mirage Sessions. The focus of this topic is on this particular set, but is also open to having any other discussion pertaining to the TCG in general. Getting Started Despite the TCG only being available in Japanese, there are a number of resources made available by fans in English which provide information on what you need to know in order to collect the cards or even how to play the game. The best source, in my opinion, is the wiki guide written here, though you can also refer to the information on the official site linked above, albeit in Japanese. Basically: New collectors who want to own specific cards of their favorite characters should get an idea of how much they individually go for at the local retailers and try to buy/trade for them within the second hand market (fellow fans in various communities). This is generally more cost friendly than the easy route of buying them off online retailers like eBay, Amazon, or TCG Republic, so you can get a lot of mileage from doing research and knowing what's out there and at what prices. If you want to import sealed starter decks, boosters, or sleeves, I recommend buying through AmiAmi. New players can try owning any of the available starter decks to help them with learning, which are ready to play and are all suitable for introducing the game. Online simulators with English translations of all the cards are out there too! The one shared on the wiki is pretty popular, although I personally prefer playing with FECipherVit. New sets are released every few months and new promo cards are regularly distributed during the interims through various means (events, magazines, etc.), so there's constantly new stuff to glean over. If you really like the art, know that many illustrators of the card artwork tend to publicly upload the full illustrations via Twitter or Pixiv, usually after the release of a new set. Some might not be available though. Card Sets Series 14 will be out on September 27, but there have already been hundreds of different cards released since the TCG started in 2015, with each set focusing on specific groups of Fire Emblem titles. For a full list of cards, you can check them out here, or search the wiki. Series 15, which will feature New Mystery of the Emblem, Genealogy of the Holy War, Thracia 776, and Conquest, will release later this year! Basic Rules In Fire Emblem Cipher, two players wage battle against each other using their army of characters, with the ultimate goal of claiming victory by defeating the opposing army's leader in combat until they can no longer be sustained by their five orbs. Each army's deck needs at least 50 cards to engage in battle, and unlike some other card games, running out of cards to draw from your deck just means you have to replenish your deck with all the cards left in your retreat to continue the battle, meaning the victory condition is all you have to focus on. Game Flow Each turn consists of these actions in the following order, which are divided into their own phases: Drawing a card from your deck Adding a card from your hand to the bond row Deploying units from your hand to the battlefield Attacking enemies, activating skills, or repositioning your units This goes back and forth between both players until one emerges as the battle's victor! Card Details Here's a quick rundown on what everything means on any card: Unit name - The name of the character depicted on the card. With the epithet, constitutes the card name. Epithet - A title distinguishing the unit from other different cards they may have. With the unit name, constitutes the card name. Power - A measure of the unit's strength when engaged in combat. Aid - A measure of the unit's strength when assisting an ally in combat. Range - Indicates how far the unit can attack in relation to their position on the battlefield. Class - Represents the unit's class and how seasoned they are. Skills - Normal skills the unit possesses, which grant various abilities. Assist skills - A type of skill which may only be activated when the unit is assisting an ally in combat. Field cost - The number of bonds needed to deploy the unit from your hand to the battlefield. Class change cost - The number of bonds needed to promote the already deployed unit to this card. Symbol - Denotes the unit's associated faction and color. Gender - The gender the unit is identified as. Weapon - The type of weapon the unit uses in combat. Types - Additional attributes of the unit if any, such as if they are a flier or armored. Further details on how the game plays can be found on the wiki. If there's anything you want clarification on, whether about the rules of the game or anything else regarding the cards, you're welcome to ask here!
  4. https://fecipher.jp/ Tempered blades strike again across the lands of Elibe, Archanea, and beyond in the upcoming expansion of Fire Emblem Cipher, the Fire Emblem trading card game! The Fire Emblem Cipher TCG is a collectible card game based on the Fire Emblem series by Nintendo and Intelligent Systems. Though it has only been available in Japan and there's no word on an official English release, it is regularly updated with new sets and rules which keep it interesting for fans to talk about. Series 13 is the upcoming expansion releasing on June 28, and will include one new booster pack featuring characters from the titles The Blazing Blade, Shadow Dragon, and Heroes. The focus of this topic is on this particular set, but is also open to having any other discussion pertaining to the TCG in general. Getting Started Despite the TCG only being available in Japanese, there are a number of resources made available by fans in English which provide information on what you need to know in order to collect the cards or even how to play the game. The best source, in my opinion, is the wiki guide written here, though you can also refer to the information on the official site linked above, albeit in Japanese. Basically: New collectors who want to own specific cards of their favorite characters should get an idea of how much they individually go for at the local retailers and try to buy/trade for them within the second hand market (fellow fans in various communities). This is generally more cost friendly than the easy route of buying them off online retailers like eBay, Amazon, or TCG Republic, so you can get a lot of mileage from doing research and knowing what's out there and at what prices. If you want to import sealed starter decks, boosters, or sleeves, I recommend buying through AmiAmi. New players can try owning any of the available starter decks to help them with learning, which are ready to play and are all suitable for introducing the game. Online simulators with English translations of all the cards are out there too! The one shared on the wiki is pretty popular, although I personally prefer playing with FECipherVit. New sets are released every few months and new promo cards are regularly distributed during the interims through various means (events, magazines, etc.), so there's constantly new stuff to glean over. If you really like the art, know that many illustrators of the card artwork tend to publicly upload the full illustrations via Twitter or Pixiv, usually after the release of a new set. Some might not be available though. Card Sets Series 13 will be out on June 28, but there have already been hundreds of different cards released since the TCG started in 2015, with each set focusing on specific groups of Fire Emblem titles. For a full list of cards, you can check them out here, or search the wiki. Series 14, which is currently completely unknown with details beyond the keyword of mugen, will release later this year! Basic Rules In Fire Emblem Cipher, two players wage battle against each other using their army of characters, with the ultimate goal of claiming victory by defeating the opposing army's leader in combat until they can no longer be sustained by their five orbs. Each army's deck needs at least 50 cards to engage in battle, and unlike some other card games, running out of cards to draw from your deck just means you have to replenish your deck with all the cards left in your retreat to continue the battle, meaning the victory condition is all you have to focus on. Game Flow Each turn consists of these actions in the following order, which are divided into their own phases: Drawing a card from your deck Adding a card from your hand to the bond row Deploying units from your hand to the battlefield Attacking enemies, activating skills, or repositioning your units This goes back and forth between both players until one emerges as the battle's victor! Card Details Here's a quick rundown on what everything means on any card: Unit name - The name of the character depicted on the card. With the epithet, constitutes the card name. Epithet - A title distinguishing the unit from other different cards they may have. With the unit name, constitutes the card name. Power - A measure of the unit's strength when engaged in combat. Aid - A measure of the unit's strength when assisting an ally in combat. Range - Indicates how far the unit can attack in relation to their position on the battlefield. Class - Represents the unit's class and how seasoned they are. Skills - Normal skills the unit possesses, which grant various abilities. Assist skills - A type of skill which may only be activated when the unit is assisting an ally in combat. Field cost - The number of bonds needed to deploy the unit from your hand to the battlefield. Class change cost - The number of bonds needed to promote the already deployed unit to this card. Symbol - Denotes the unit's associated faction and color. Gender - The gender the unit is identified as. Weapon - The type of weapon the unit uses in combat. Types - Additional attributes of the unit if any, such as if they are a flier or armored. Further details on how the game plays can be found on the wiki. If there's anything you want clarification on, whether about the rules of the game or anything else regarding the cards, you're welcome to ask here!
  5. Tyranogre

    Ty's Tiki Album

    By popular demand, a compilation of photos dedicated to my beloved waifu, Tiki, that I've taken over the past several years, usually on her birthday (February 28th). Please note that this is merely a compilation album. Any future Tiki birthdays will get their own threads (though this one will also be updated to include future photos). In roughly chronological order: Tiki is love, Tiki is life.
  6. Reilly

    Reilly Plays FE8

    Looks like everyone is bringing back their old FE LP threads. Might as well bring back mine, too. Free post count boost, I guess. Thought I'd try one of these runs, in part because I miss the Nuzlocke community of the Safari Zone, in part because I don't have a lot of experience with the franchise and would like to change that. The only FE game I've ever played to the end is Awakening, and the only other two that I've tried are FE7 (on my Wii U) and Sacred Stones (on my 3DS), and even then, I'm only a few chapters into each. If I knew the story better, I might have decided to work my sprite comic magic, as I did with my Nuzlocke (which I still haven't completed theydonothing;), but since I don't know it all that well, I'm going to try out the screenshot-caption format that most people use around here. Hopefully, I manage to capture most of the important plot stuff. I'm new to this format of storytelling, as well, so please feel free to give me some pointers and criticisms on the way I'm handling the presentation. I can't promise a consistent update schedule, as I'm busy with grad school and things, but I'll try to update at least once every weekend. Within Awakening and my limited experience with FE7 and 8, I noticed myself resetting every time I lose a unit, struggling to accept the permanent death mechanic that makes the franchise unique. I'm going to use this run to try to full-on embrace the permanent death mechanic, which is how I got the inspiration for the name. For those unfamiliar with the A Song of Ice and Fire novels or the TV series Game of Thrones, all you need to know is this: All of your favorite characters will probably die. Wish me luck! Prologue: Welcome to Magvel!
  7. https://fecipher.jp/ The battles rage on across the lands of Tellius, Ylisse, and Jugdral in the upcoming expansion of Fire Emblem Cipher, the Fire Emblem trading card game! The Fire Emblem Cipher TCG is a collectible card game based on the Fire Emblem series by Nintendo and Intelligent Systems. Though it has only been available in Japan and there's no word on an official English release, it is regularly updated with new sets and rules which keep it interesting for fans to talk about. Series 12 is the upcoming expansion releasing on March 22, and will include one new booster pack featuring characters from the titles Path of Radiance/Radiant Dawn, Awakening, and Genealogy of the Holy War. The focus of this topic is on this particular set, but is also open to having any other discussion pertaining to the TCG in general. Getting Started Despite the TCG only being available in Japanese, there are a number of resources made available by fans in English which provide information on what you need to know in order to collect the cards or even how to play the game. The best source, in my opinion, is the wiki guide written here, though you can also refer to the information on the official site linked above, albeit in Japanese. Basically: New collectors who want to own specific cards of their favorite characters should get an idea of how much they individually go for at the local retailers and try to buy/trade for them within the second hand market (fellow fans in various communities). This is generally more cost friendly than the easy route of buying them off online retailers like eBay, Amazon, or TCG Republic, so you can get a lot of mileage from doing research and knowing what's out there and at what prices. If you want to import sealed starter decks, boosters, or sleeves, I recommend buying through AmiAmi. New players can try owning any of the available starter decks to help them with learning, which are ready to play and are all suitable for introducing the game. Online simulators with English translations of all the cards are out there too! The one shared on the wiki is pretty popular, although I personally prefer playing with FECipherVit. New sets are released every few months and new promo cards are regularly distributed during the interims through various means (events, magazines, etc.), so there's constantly new stuff to glean over. If you really like the art, know that many illustrators of the card artwork tend to publicly upload the full illustrations via Twitter or Pixiv, usually after the release of a new set. Some might not be available though. Card Sets Series 12 will be out on March 22, but there have already been hundreds of different cards released since the TCG started in 2015, with each set focusing on specific groups of Fire Emblem titles. For a full list of cards, you can check them out here, or search the wiki. Series 13, which is confirmed to feature characters from the titles Shadow Dragon, Blazing Blade, and Heroes, will release later this year! Basic Rules In Fire Emblem Cipher, two players wage battle against each other using their army of characters, with the ultimate goal of claiming victory by defeating the opposing army's leader in combat until they can no longer be sustained by their five orbs. Each army's deck needs at least 50 cards to engage in battle, and unlike some other card games, running out of cards to draw from your deck just means you have to replenish your deck with all the cards left in your retreat to continue the battle, meaning the victory condition is all you have to focus on. Game Flow Each turn consists of these actions in the following order, which are divided into their own phases: Drawing a card from your deck Adding a card from your hand to the bond row Deploying units from your hand to the battlefield Attacking enemies, activating skills, or repositioning your units This goes back and forth between both players until one emerges as the battle's victor! Card Details Here's a quick rundown on what everything means on any card: Unit name - The name of the character depicted on the card. With the epithet, constitutes the card name. Epithet - A title distinguishing the unit from other different cards they may have. With the unit name, constitutes the card name. Power - A measure of the unit's strength when engaged in combat. Aid - A measure of the unit's strength when assisting an ally in combat. Range - Indicates how far the unit can attack in relation to their position on the battlefield. Class - Represents the unit's class and how seasoned they are. Skills - Normal skills the unit possesses, which grant various abilities. Assist skills - A type of skill which may only be activated when the unit is assisting an ally in combat. Field cost - The number of bonds needed to deploy the unit from your hand to the battlefield. Class change cost - The number of bonds needed to promote the already deployed unit to this card. Symbol - Denotes the unit's associated faction and color. Gender - The gender the unit is identified as. Weapon - The type of weapon the unit uses in combat. Types - Additional attributes of the unit if any, such as if they are a flier or armored. Further details on how the game plays can be found on the wiki. If there's anything you want clarification on, whether about the rules of the game or anything else regarding the cards, you're welcome to ask here!
  8. Tyranogre

    Archer Appreciation Day

    In honor of the 3-13 Archer from Radiant Dawn, the 13th day of the 3rd month is dedicated to the under-appreciated Archer class from the Fire Emblem series. However, with the ongoing success of Heroes, Nintendo seems to have lost sight of what it means to be an Archer. A lovestruck Pegasus Knight in a wedding dress? That's an Archer. A Thief in a swimsuit shooting popsicles at people? That's an Archer. A Butler dressed up like Frankenstein's Monster? That's an Archer (and an Armor Knight, apparently). But perhaps more distressingly, this neglect is also carrying over to other spinoff games: in Warriors, all four bow-users have the exact same moveset. This is a problem, because in the past two "mainline" games, Archers have also served as the most prominent representation of the LGBT community. Prior to Niles and Leon, the only explicitly LGBT character was Heather from Radiant Dawn. Now, what was her class? Thief. Therefore, Nintendo equated LGBT characters with people who break the law. Now, the entire above paragraph may have been shitposting, but the point still stands: Archers are an under-appreciated class that deserve more respect. So, who are YOUR favorite Archers?
  9. Tyranogre

    Tiki's Birthday 2018

    The time has once again come to wish a happy birthday to the Daughter of Naga, Princess of the Divine Dragons, and love of my life, Tiki. This past year has been a big one for the both of us. Not only has she gotten three units in Fire Emblem Heroes, but she's also playable in Fire Emblem Warriors. But I'd also like to share something that I neglected to mention in last year's thread. If anyone wants to skip it, feel free to. Happy birthday, Tiki. No amount of ridicule from people on the internet will ever diminish my love for you. I probably could've gotten away with posting the unedited version of that picture without covering up her nipple in photoshop, but I didn't want to risk it.
  10. https://fecipher.jp/ Journey through distant roads across the lands of Magvel, Aytolis, and Valentia in the upcoming expansion of Fire Emblem Cipher, the Fire Emblem trading card game! The Fire Emblem Cipher TCG is a collectible card game based on the Fire Emblem series by Nintendo and Intelligent Systems. Though it has only been available in Japan and there's no word on an official English release, it is regularly updated with new sets and rules which keep it interesting for fans to talk about. Getting Started Despite the TCG only being available in Japanese, there are a number of resources made available by fans in English which provide information on what you need to know in order to collect the cards or even how to play the game. The best source, in my opinion, is the wiki guide written here, though you can also refer to the information on the official site linked above, albeit in Japanese. Basically: New collectors who want to own specific cards of their favorite characters should get an idea of how much they individually go for at the local retailers and try to buy/trade for them within the second hand market (fellow fans in various communities). This is generally more cost friendly than the easy route of buying them off online retailers like eBay, Amazon, or TCG Republic, so you can get a lot of mileage from doing research and knowing what's out there and at what prices. If you want to import sealed starter decks, boosters, or sleeves, I recommend buying through AmiAmi. New players can try owning any of the available starter decks to help them with learning, which are ready to play and are all suitable for introducing the game. Online simulators with English translations of all the cards are out there too! The one shared on the wiki is pretty popular, although I personally prefer playing with FECipherVit. New sets are released every few months and new promo cards are regularly distributed during the interims through various means (events, magazines, etc.), so there's constantly new stuff to glean over. If you really like the art, know that many illustrators of the card artwork tend to publicly upload the full illustrations via Twitter or Pixiv, usually after the release of a new set. Some might not be available though. Card Sets Series 11 will be out on December 7, but there have already been hundreds of different cards released since the TCG started in 2015, with each set focusing on specific groups of Fire Emblem titles. For a full list of cards, you can check them out here, or search the wiki. Series 12, which is confirmed to feature Fire Emblem Awakening, Fire Emblem: Genealogy of the Holy War, Fire Emblem: Path of Radiance, and Fire Emblem: Radiant Dawn, will release early next year. Basic Rules In Fire Emblem Cipher, two players wage battle against each other using their army of characters, with the ultimate goal of claiming victory by defeating the opposing army's leader in combat until they can no longer be sustained by their five orbs. Each army's deck needs at least 50 cards to engage in battle, and unlike some other card games, running out of cards to draw from your deck just means you have to replenish your deck with all the cards left in your retreat to continue the battle, meaning the victory condition is all you have to focus on. Game Flow Each turn consists of these actions in the following order, which are divided into their own phases: Drawing a card from your deck Adding a card from your hand to the bond row Deploying units from your hand to the battlefield Attacking enemies, activating skills, or repositioning your units This goes back and forth between both players until one emerges as the battle's victor! Card Details Here's a quick rundown on what everything means on any card: Unit name - The name of the character depicted on the card. With the epithet, constitutes the card name. Epithet - A title distinguishing the unit from other different cards they may have. With the unit name, constitutes the card name. Power - A measure of the unit's strength when engaged in combat. Aid - A measure of the unit's strength when assisting an ally in combat. Range - Indicates how far the unit can attack in relation to their position on the battlefield. Class - Represents the unit's class and how seasoned they are. Skills - Normal skills the unit possesses, which grant various abilities. Assist skills - A type of skill which may only be activated when the unit is assisting an ally in combat. Field cost - The number of bonds needed to deploy the unit from your hand to the battlefield. Class change cost - The number of bonds needed to promote the already deployed unit to this card. Symbol - Denotes the unit's associated faction and color. Gender - The gender the unit is identified as. Weapon - The type of weapon the unit uses in combat. Types - Additional attributes of the unit if any, such as if they are a flier or armored. Further details on how the game plays can be found on the wiki. If there's anything you want clarification on, whether about the rules of the game or anything else regarding the cards, you're welcome to ask here!
  11. Chrom

    Fire Emblem Warriors

    http://fireemblemwarriors.nintendo.com/ Heroes from across the Fire Emblem universe collide in Fire Emblem Warriors on Nintendo Switch and New Nintendo 3DS, available starting October 20th! General discussion for FE Warriors goes here!
  12. The Legend of Zelda got the Musou treatment a few years ago on Wii U and 3DS, and now it's Fire Emblem's turn. Fire Emblem Warriors combines the colorful characters of Nintendo's strategy RPG series with the visceral and over-the-top action of Musou games like Dynasty Warriors and Samurai Warriors. Thoughtful, turn-based combat is traded for real-time action where hundreds of enemies charge at your heroes, heroes drawn from across the history of Fire Emblem (though largely from the more recent entries in the series). It may be quite a gameplay change for Fire Emblem but like peanut butter and chocolate the two come together perfectly. Nintendo fans familiar with Hyrule Warriors will see some immediate similarities with FEW: worlds collide when portals between different Fire Emblem universes open up, allowing various heroes to fight alongside one another. And just like in Hyrule Warriors there are a few original characters as well. Rowan and Lianna are the twin prince and princess of Aytolis, and they're the ones that bind the group together on their quest to prevent the revival of the evil dragon Velezark. The plot isn't exactly a complex piece of writing, but FEW is still first and foremost a game catering to fans who want to see their favorite characters interact with one another. It may not be an elaborate story but it's fun to see a bunch of characters team up and battle alongside one another. There are even some support conversations as in the main series which is a nice touch, especially when characters from different universes interact. Musou games are founded upon a very simple tenet: it is a lot of fun to destroy enemy armies. Sure you have specific goals on each map and there are sub missions to keep you occupied as well but when it comes down to it, games like FEW are satisfying just for the enjoyment of wrecking whole swathes of enemy soldiers and building your kill count as high as you can. Sure it can be a little mindless at times but it really is gratifying to play. And to be fair there is still an element of strategy at play here as well. It's not quite on the same level as the main Fire Emblem series, but it's enough that if all you're doing is knocking down enemies you're not going to win on some of the tougher maps. In FEW you're both fighter and tactician, and you need to keep an eye on the whole battlefield to know where your ass-kicking skills are most needed at any given moment. Allies may be in danger, powerful enemies may spawn in unexpected locations, or one area of the map may just be overrun. The game alerts you to these developments, though sometimes it's hard to tell exactly what is happening on the mini-map. Thankfully there are some important strategy tools at your disposal. You can pause the game to get a good look at the map and direct your characters to attack or defend certain points. You can also switch between characters at any time—the AI is simply never as effective as a player controlled character—so you can quickly move to whatever point needs you most. On the truly difficult maps it can feel like spinning plates, trying to keep your army afloat against overwhelming odds, but that just makes the victory all the more satisfying. FEW also takes a few cues from the Fire Emblem series to add a bit more nuance to the gameplay. FEW features the weapons triangle (sword beats axe, axe beats lance, lance beats sword) and when you have advantage over an enemy it's easier to stun them and deal heavy damage. You can only bring so many characters into each battle so you'll want to survey the map and plan accordingly as far as what weapons might be most useful. You can also pair up characters just like recent Fire Emblem games, adding a bit of offensive and defensive power to the main character. Some characters on the map are strictly there for support purposes but if you pair up two playable characters you can switch between the two and make better use of the weapon triangle to take down enemies. It's great to have a bit more strategy at play in the game, but on the flipside you aren't beholden to it. If you want you can fight lance users with a sword-wielding character—it'll be a little harder, but FEW also has RPG leveling, so if you are a few levels above your opponent you won't have much trouble cutting through them like paper anyway. If you really want to stick to using specific characters you can (for the most part; some maps do have requirements/restrictions on whom you can bring). And with twenty playable characters in the main game—with more as unlockables and DLC—you're bound to find some that are your favorites. Even outside of the different weapon classes there is a decent amount of variety in how each character fights, so replaying maps with different characters can feel a little different. And Musou games are gold mines for replay value. You can build up support levels between characters, raise levels, earn gold, and gather items for upgrading character skill trees. Suffice it to say that, if you want to 100% complete FEW, you'll be putting a lot of time into the game. And if those hours upon hours of gameplay aren't enough the game also has a string of DLC planned, some of which is even free. A lot of it can be pretty repetitive but it's still satisfying to destroy waves of enemies, even the hundredth time you've done it. FEW also features split-screen co-op, and the only thing better than decimating enemy armies is being able to do it with a buddy. Co-op can also make it easier to coordinate your units since you can just plan together what needs to be done and cover more ground. The downside is the game takes a pretty noticeable hit to performance with two players. When one player is using a special attack the frame rate drops, and since the game is rendering two characters at different locations there are a lot fewer enemies on screen—sometimes this can actually make it a lot harder to hit the bonus goal of 1,000 enemy kills in a single map. The mini-map is also poorly handled in co-op. Both players get their own mini-map which is not only completely unnecessary, but it makes actually seeing the details of the map difficult. Of course you can just pause the game and look at the map there but it really is silly to have separate maps with a split-screen view. It has been quite a while since Fire Emblem fans have gotten to see a game made for a home console rather than handheld, and never before in HD. As a fan of the series it's a lot of fun to see these characters on the big screen, with all of the flashy, over-the-top attacks that pause the battle just so you can drink in all of the destruction. Even if the normal soldiers are pretty faceless there's still something so satisfying about seeing whole waves of them get knocked down with each attack. The game also has a pretty solid rock soundtrack, fused with bits of familiar Fire Emblem themes, but you'd hardly know it while playing. During battle it seems like characters never stop talking, whether to announce some change in battle or spout out a one-liner before a special attack. It's not that the voice acting is poor, for the most part it's pretty good, but it's kind of shame that it steps on the soundtrack's toes so often. As a longtime fan of Fire Emblem it's so much fun to see how much the franchise's popularity has boomed over the past few years, to the point where it now has a spin-off largely catered to the fans. But where Fire Emblem is slower paced and strategic, Fire Emblem Warriors is fast, chaotic, and thrilling. It's a distinctly different style but the characters of Fire Emblem and the gameplay of the Musou series manage to blend perfectly in a game all about fast, rewarding action gameplay. This game doesn't do much to reinvent the Musou franchise—there is still an undeniably repetitive cycle to the way these games work—but at the end of the day it doesn't really need to. Fire Emblem Warriors is still a beautifully action-packed game, one that will reward tenacious players with hours upon hours of game time. The only question now is: what will be the next Nintendo franchise to get the Musou treatment? Rating: 8 out of 10 Emblems
  13. https://fecipher.jp/ Deliver the justice across the lands of Zenith, Jugdral, and more in the upcoming expansion of Fire Emblem Cipher, the Fire Emblem trading card game! The Fire Emblem Cipher TCG is a collectible card game based on the Fire Emblem series by Nintendo and Intelligent Systems. Though it has only been available in Japan and there's no word on an official English release, it is regularly updated with new sets and rules which keep it interesting for fans to talk about. Getting Started Despite the TCG only being available in Japanese, there are a number of resources made available by fans in English which provide information on what you need to know in order to collect the cards or even how to play the game. The best source, in my opinion, is the wiki guide written here, though you can also refer to the information on the official site linked above, albeit in Japanese. Basically: New collectors who want to own specific cards of their favorite characters should get an idea of how much they individually go for at the local retailers and try to buy/trade for them within the second hand market (fellow fans in various communities). This is generally more cost friendly than the easy route of buying them off online retailers like eBay, Amazon, or TCG Republic, so you can get a lot of mileage from doing research and knowing what's out there and at what prices. If you want to import sealed starter decks, boosters, or sleeves, I recommend buying through AmiAmi. New players can try owning any of the available starter decks to help them with learning, which are ready to play and are all suitable for introducing the game. Online simulators with English translations of all the cards are out there too! The one shared on the wiki is pretty popular, although I personally prefer playing with FECipherVit. New sets are released every few months and new promo cards are regularly distributed during the interims through various means (events, magazines, etc.), so there's constantly new stuff to glean over. If you really like the art, know that many illustrators of the card artwork tend to publicly upload the full illustrations via Twitter or Pixiv, usually after the release of a new set. Some might not be available though. Card Sets Series 10 will be out on September 21, but there have already been hundreds of different cards released since the TCG started in 2015, with each set focusing on specific groups of Fire Emblem titles. For a full list of cards, you can check them out here, or search the wiki. Series 11, which is confirmed to feature Fire Emblem: The Sacred Stones, Fire Emblem Warriors, Fire Emblem Echoes: Shadows of Valentia, will release later this year. Basic Rules In Fire Emblem Cipher, two players wage battle against each other using their army of characters, with the ultimate goal of claiming victory by defeating the opposing army's leader in combat until they can no longer be sustained by their five orbs. Each army's deck needs at least 50 cards to engage in battle, and unlike some other card games, running out of cards to draw from your deck just means you have to replenish your deck with all the cards left in your retreat to continue the battle, meaning the victory condition is all you have to focus on. Game Flow Each turn consists of these actions in the following order, which are divided into their own phases: Drawing a card from your deck Adding a card from your hand to the bond row Deploying units from your hand to the battlefield Attacking enemies, activating skills, or repositioning your units This goes back and forth between both players until one emerges as the battle's victor! Card Details Here's a quick rundown on what everything means on any card: Unit name - The name of the character depicted on the card. With the epithet, constitutes the card name. Epithet - A title distinguishing the unit from other different cards they may have. With the unit name, constitutes the card name. Power - A measure of the unit's strength when engaged in combat. Aid - A measure of the unit's strength when assisting an ally in combat. Range - Indicates how far the unit can attack in relation to their position on the battlefield. Class - Represents the unit's class and how seasoned they are. Skills - Normal skills the unit possesses, which grant various abilities. Assist skills - A type of skill which may only be activated when the unit is assisting an ally in combat. Field cost - The number of bonds needed to deploy the unit from your hand to the battlefield. Class change cost - The number of bonds needed to promote the already deployed unit to this card. Symbol - Denotes the unit's associated faction and color. Gender - The gender the unit is identified as. Weapon - The type of weapon the unit uses in combat. Types - Additional attributes of the unit if any, such as if they are a flier or armored. Further details on how the game plays can be found on the wiki. If there's anything you want clarification on, whether about the rules of the game or anything else regarding the cards, you're welcome to ask here!
  14. The next playable character in Fire Emblem Warriors has been revealed via Famitsu, and it’s the final one of the royal siblings from Fire Emblem Fates, Sakura. Her main weapon is a bow, which she could use in Fates if she promoted into a Priestess. Edit: Forgot to add that Male Corrin is also confirmed. http://nintendoeverything.com/sakura-revealed-as-next-playable-character-in-fire-emblem-warriors/#disqus_thread
  15. Cordelia and Female Robin confirmed for Fire Emblem Warriors!
  16. https://fecipher.jp/ Uncover hidden strengths from across Valentia, Elibe, and Tellius in the upcoming expansion of Fire Emblem Cipher, the Fire Emblem trading card game! The Fire Emblem Cipher TCG is a collectible card game based on the Fire Emblem series by Nintendo and Intelligent Systems. Though it has only been available in Japan and there's no word on an official English release, it is regularly updated with new sets and rules which keep it interesting for fans to talk about. Getting Started Despite the TCG only being available in Japanese, there are a number of resources made available by fans in English which provide information on what you need to know in order to collect the cards or even how to play the game. The best source, in my opinion, is the wiki guide written here, though you can also refer to the information on the official site linked above, albeit in Japanese. Basically: New collectors who want to own specific cards of their favorite characters should get an idea of how much they individually go for at the local retailers and try to buy/trade for them within the second hand market (fellow fans in various communities). This is generally more cost friendly than the easy route of buying them off online retailers like eBay, Amazon, or TCG Republic, so you can get a lot of mileage from doing research and knowing what's out there and at what prices. If you want to import sealed starter decks, boosters, or sleeves, I recommend buying through AmiAmi. New players can try owning any of the available starter decks to help them with learning, which are ready to play and are all suitable for introducing the game. Online simulators with English translations of all the cards are out there too! The one shared on the wiki is pretty popular, although I personally prefer playing with FECipherVit. New sets are released every few months and new promo cards are regularly distributed during the interims through various means (events, magazines, etc.), so there's constantly new stuff to glean over. If you really like the art, know that many illustrators of the card artwork tend to publicly upload the full illustrations via Twitter or Pixiv, usually after the release of a new set. Some might not be available though. Card Sets Series 9 will be out on June 22, but there have already been hundreds of different cards released since the TCG started in 2015, with each set focusing on specific groups of Fire Emblem titles. For a full list of cards, you can check them out here, or search the wiki. Series 10, which is confirmed to feature Fire Emblem: Thracia 776, Fire Emblem Fates: Conquest, Fire Emblem Fates: Birthright, and Fire Emblem Heroes, will release later this year. It has also been announced that Fire Emblem: The Sacred Stones and Fire Emblem Warriors will be featured in a Cipher set release at some point this year, most likely in Series 11. Basic Rules In Fire Emblem Cipher, two players wage battle against each other using their army of characters, with the ultimate goal of claiming victory by defeating the opposing army's leader in combat until they can no longer be sustained by their five orbs. Each army's deck needs at least 50 cards to engage in battle, and unlike some other card games, running out of cards to draw from your deck just means you have to replenish your deck with all the cards left in your retreat to continue the battle, meaning the victory condition is all you have to focus on. Game Flow Each turn consists of these actions in the following order, which are divided into their own phases: Drawing a card from your deck Adding a card from your hand to the bond row Deploying units from your hand to the battlefield Attacking enemies, activating skills, or repositioning your units This goes back and forth between both players until one emerges as the battle's victor! Card Details Here's a quick rundown on what everything means on any card: Unit name - The name of the character depicted on the card. With the epithet, constitutes the card name. Epithet - A title distinguishing the unit from other different cards they may have. With the unit name, constitutes the card name. Power - A measure of the unit's strength when engaged in combat. Aid - A measure of the unit's strength when assisting an ally in combat. Range - Indicates how far the unit can attack in relation to their position on the battlefield. Class - Represents the unit's class and how seasoned they are. Skills - Normal skills the unit possesses, which grant various abilities. Assist skills - A type of skill which may only be activated when the unit is assisting an ally in combat. Field cost - The number of bonds needed to deploy the unit from your hand to the battlefield. Class change cost - The number of bonds needed to promote the already deployed unit to this card. Symbol - Denotes the unit's associated faction and color. Gender - The gender the unit is identified as. Weapon - The type of weapon the unit uses in combat. Types - Additional attributes of the unit if any, such as if they are a flier or armored. Further details on how the game plays can be found on the wiki. If there's anything you want clarification on, whether about the rules of the game or anything else regarding the cards, you're welcome to ask here!
  17. DISCLAIMER: This is a reproduction of a thread on NS2, which has long since been lost to the flow of time. I am re-posting it here for archival purposes only, as it is the origin of an inside joke that few people would otherwise understand. The opinions expressed in this thread are solely those of the people being quoted, and do not reflect the views of N4A or any of its affiliates. Additionally, N4A is not responsible for any brain damage caused by prolonged exposure to this thread. Since I'm shit at editing, I'll just tag each post by putting the person's name in front of it. The_Ultimate_Mario_Fan: @DLurkster: The_Ultimate_Mario_Fan: @DLurkster: @Youngster Joey: @Carl321: @Chrom: @K The_Ultimate_Mario_Fan (from here on out referred to as TUMF): Sorry, but Romans ARE Italians. There's a reason Rome is known as "The Eternal City." Just because we call Rome part of Italy now doesn't mean Rome can't be considered Italian history as well. "Felicità" means "happiness" in Italian, so it does seem they are decidedly focusing on Italian themes, even if in ostensibly minor ways. I hope they continue to inject more of this culture into the game. Also, "if" in Italian is "se." I wonder if that means anything.... (SE.... Square Enix? :o) @K: Except you used the word culture not history, Roman culture is not italian culture. And no Romans are not italians. TUMF: No, it is, at least in a matter of speaking. It isn't current Italian culture, no, but historically Rome is inextricably tied with Italian history and its culture. Think of Rome as the Proto-Italy. And that second sentence is almost as dense as saying New Yorkers aren't Americans. @Chrom: The first two Fire Emblem games on the GBA also had some minor Italian flavor, for what it's worth. For example, there's a territory called Tuscany and an entire region named after Etruria. In fact, the whole continent of Elibe (the setting of the aforementioned games) is even shaped like Europe, so those games are rife with a ton of similar European references, although none as blatant as the Mouth of Truth monster. @K: That's not what your original sentence meant though, what you're saying now is that it's tied to Roman culture, which is true, but it's tied because roman artifacts an and ruins are in Italy and they have based their daily lives around those things. To say Roman culture is Italian culture is a fallacy. And Rome is in no way a Proto-Italy. Only if New Yorkers lived thousands of years ago and had been conquered a dozen or so times. Making that comparison is dense. TUMF: Uh dude, yes it is. "Proto" means "earliest" or "ancestral" and Rome indeed far predates the Italy as the way we know it today. Also, numerous Roman customs carried over into the Italian way of life. The Mouth of Truth has since been adopted as a quintessential part of Italian cultural history as well. So many aspects of Rome have been enmeshed with the Italians that you can't just cleanly separate them like that, especially considering that Rome hasn't exactly changed locations. And let me just make sure: Are you aware that Romans still exist? Yes? Then you'll see how silly you sound. Ancient Romans on the other hand technically aren't Italian because Italy didn't exist yet. However, it isn't a stretch to call these Romans a part of Italian history, as without Rome, the Italy we know today basically wouldn't exist. Now let's please get back on topic. @K: Clearly you don't get how proto is used, just because they were a civilization that existed in the same space as the current italy and borrowed some customs doesn't mean they were Proto-Italians, they were completely different culturally. And I didn't say you couldn't say that there are parts of Italian culture tied to Roman culture I said that Italian Culture is not Roman culture. You know I was talking about Ancient Romans, or did you not read when I was talking about thousands of years ago. You even saying something like that just makes you seem spiteful. And I said from the beginning that I wasn't arguing that Romans weren't part of Italian history, I've been arguing your use of the word culture this whole time and yet you seem to not get that. TUMF: That's what I'm trying to get through to you: Romans were not "completely" different culturally--which also depends on what era of Italy you are drawing a comparison with--and were the same geographically. "Proto" can indeed be used here. Your point of contention was that the Mouth of Truth is not Italian, which simply isn't true--it is both Italian AND Roman. I frankly found it disrespectful that you would deny this artifact is in any way Italian when it has resided in Italy for centuries (millennia geographically), regardless of its origin, but to each his own. Italian is one of the few things I take very seriously around here and if I have learned anything from this prattle, it's that you're exceedingly persnickety when it comes to subjective semantics. For the record, I never said nor meant that Italian culture was the same as Ancient Roman culture. @K: So you would call Roman Armor Italian Armor as well? America isn't completely culturally different from Rome or Japan or Irish. There isn't a culture out there that doesn't take some small things from another, but if you're gonna tell me that Italian culture is even close to what Roman culture was then you're sadly misinformed. You know arguing semantics is not an insult right? You said things that were incorrect and now your saying that's not what you meant? @Iridium: This would almost be a good comparison if you'd at least said "New Yorkers aren't English", considering that that's far closer to what you're trying to compare it to. They were English at one point. Aspects of English culture carried into their society. That doesn't make them the successor to England or Modern Englishmen or anything like that. English history/culture/society, for the most part, is not the history/culture/society of New York. @Malkon: TUMF: It wasn't intended to be an insult, it was a tired statement. And please point out where I say the Italian and Ancient Roman cultures are the same, because I never did. However, I cannot agree that Ancient Rome, and especially Rome, shares no relation with Italy or its history and culture. The Romans and Ancient Romans are different, my friend. If you want to trade blows, take it to PMs. In the interest of conserving space, I'm cutting it off here at the end of page 1. Pages 2 and 3 will be up sometime after dinner.
  18. So I saw this on GoNintendo earlier today but this trailer was shown at the 2017 Japan Expo. Believe it confirms Male Robin, Frederick, Lissa and Lucina. It could just be a confirmation for them being in the story. Pick a God and Pray!
  19. http://fireemblemechoes.nintendo.com/ Intro Fire Emblem Echoes: Shadows of Valentia is an enhanced remake of the second game in the Fire Emblem series, Fire Emblem Gaiden, which was originally released exclusively for the Famicom in 1992. In the game, players lead Alm and Celica along parallel paths in a quest to bring peace to a war-torn land through turn-based strategic battles. Now remade, remastered, and releasing outside of Japan for the first time ever, players can embark on the adventure on Nintendo 3DS with new features, including full voice acting, animated cutscenes, and new story content. In addition to the standard retail version and digital edition on Nintendo eShop, the Fire Emblem Echoes: Shadows of Valentia Limited Edition has been made available too. Along with the retail version, comes with: Valentia Artbook (~40 pages) Reversible title sheet (designed after the original Fire Emblem Gaiden cover) Sound Selection CD (30 tracks) Pin Set (Alm, Celica, Marth) Features Explore Dungeons in 3D In a series first, players can explore dungeons in full 3D environments. Dive deep into what lies ahead, collecting treasure and engaging enemies in real time (though the actual battles are still in classic Fire Emblem fashion). Difficulty Options When you start a new game, you can choose options such as Classic Mode, where fallen warriors are gone forever, or Casual Mode, where the fallen return in the next battle. Relationships Position heroes next to each other on the battlefield and you may get to see extra conversations between characters. There are no mechanics tied to an avatar, marriage, or children like in Fire Emblem Awakening or Fire Emblem Fates. Tour the Towns You can visit towns and villages to talk to locals, look for items, and get quests. You may even meet new recruits to add to your armies. Experience Need to level up certain characters? Use them to explore 3D dungeons as many times as you like. Choose Your Battles Keep an eye on the map for new enemies that pop up in areas you’ve visited—then go get ‘em. Mila's Turnwheel You can use this special function during battle to revert back to a previous turn...helpful if you make a bad choice. amiibo With the Alm and Celica amiibo figures releasing alongside the game (exclusively as a two-pack in North America, individually elsewhere), you can challenge special dungeons. Test your mettle to see if you have what it takes to overcome them. In addition, you can tap an amiibo of a Fire Emblem character during battle to summon an ally in their likeness to assist you for one turn. The Alm and Celica amiibo can also store data so that you can retain their stats as they grow stronger. And if you don't have any amiibo of Fire Emblem characters, any other amiibo will work too and summon a random monster ally. DLC Build up your army with purchasable downloadable content. Some packs let you farm for items, experience, or in-game currency, while others offer more story content or add new characters. Fire Emblem Echoes: Shadows of Valentia offers five different DLC packs that will be released weekly starting at launch, but you may buy them all in advance with a single purchase via the season pass at a discount ($44.99 USD) versus buying each piece of DLC individually. Fledgling Warriors Pack ($7.99 USD): A bundle of maps and a dungeon designed to aid novice warriors in the opening stages of their adventure. Undaunted Heroes Pack ($9.99 USD): A bundle of maps and a dungeon designed to aid seasoned champions in the latter stages of their adventure. Lost Altars Pack ($14.99 USD): A set of altars that grant power beyond normal human limits to those that are worthy. Each of these maps allows a character that has reached their maximum level to move up. Rise of the Deliverance Pack ($12.99 USD): A prequel pack of four maps tracing the war waged by the Deliverance. It occurs shortly before the start of Alm's tale. Cipher Companions Pack ($5.99 USD): Each pack in this two-pack set introduces two exclusive characters from the Japanese Fire Emblem Cipher trading card game. The characters will also be usable in the main game and will be fully voiced. For more information on DLC, you can check out this page: http://fireemblemechoes.nintendo.com/dlc/ Trailers Here's a collection of official videos by Nintendo promoting the game. Also included here as a bonus is Nintendo Minute's unboxing video of the Limited Edition. Launch Trailer Extended TV Cut Warring Gods Zofia's Call Two Armies 'A Master Class in Strategy' DLC Briefing Limited Edition Unboxing – Nintendo Minute Enjoy the game!
  20. With the advent of the first new details about the upcoming Fire Emblem Warriors for Nintendo Switch and New Nintendo 3DS, Koei Tecmo has just launched the official site for the game, as well as an official Twitter account (@FireEmblemMusou) for the Japanese audience. The site at this time mostly just provides the same details as the preliminary info that was recently published by Famitsu (summarized in English here), but even more information is expected to arrive soon, as the Twitter account has posted that they intend to provide daily updates on the game. The game's planned release for fall 2017 is still a ways off, but in the meantime, these daily Twitter updates should prove to help make the wait more interesting as we learn more and more about the game over the next few months. Thus, the purpose of this topic is to facilitate any discussion regarding these forthcoming updates. Feel free to share or talk about any of them! To start, the Twitter account itself has revealed one entirely new detail: the presence of Anna, who serves as something of a series mascot for Fire Emblem, so it's little surprise to see that she serves a role in this new title. Whether or not she is actually playable has yet to be revealed!
  21. When Fire Emblem finally made its international debut in 2003 with the GBA game, it was actually the seventh game in a series already well regarded in Japan. For several years American players didn't have a chance to play those earlier six games, until Fire Emblem: Shadow Dragon, a remake of the first game, released on the DS in 2009. It's been close to a decade since then but Nintendo has finally treated its international Fire Emblem fans to another taste of those early strategy adventures with Fire Emblem Echoes: Shadows of Valentia, a remake of the second game in the series, Fire Emblem Gaiden. Shadows of Valentia isn't just a glimpse into the history of Fire Emblem though. Similar to Zelda II this sequel deviated from several of the features from the first game that would go on to become series norms. Shadows of Valentia retains most of these quirks while adding new features familiar to modern players to make one of the more unusual but just as captivating Fire Emblem games. The basic story of Valentia my seem familiar for anyone that has played a previous Fire Emblem game: the two nations of Rigel and Zofia are fundamentally opposed to one another in ideology, and when a coup kills the king of Zofia a war erupts on the continent of Valentia. There's more intrigue at play here though with missing royal heirs, as well as a missing goddess. It's a fine backdrop for a Fire Emblem story made better by a strong cast of characters. Alm and Celica share the spotlight as the key protagonists, and despite a childhood friendship find themselves on separate quests across Valentia. Their interactions with one another and the rest of the cast prove compelling, especially since there are essentially two armies in the game (Alm's and Celica's) so it doesn't feel like there are as many fluff characters as you might encounter in past Fire Emblems. The characters have a realistic amount of depth in their support conversations–after C level at least, many of which are oddly abrupt–and by the final plot twists of the game it's easy to care for all of them. As mentioned Shadows of Valentia retains many of the unique features of the original Gaiden. One of the more significant ones is dungeon exploration, where you can explore small caves and shrines to find treasure and battle monsters (battles are in the traditional strategy map grid). It feels strange for a Fire Emblem game at first, but it's a novel feature and a fun change of pace. The enemies within these dungeons are generally push-overs and you can get advantage on them before the battle by striking them, which makes them ideal for training weak units. On the other hand these battles can be so easy at times that it feels like you're wading through battle fodder, which can be fatiguing–literally, in this game's case. The fatigue system is brought back from Thracia 776, so when you use one unit a lot in battle they might tire out which causes their stats to drop. It's pretty much a non-issue in Shadows of Valentia though. For one, fatigue isn't a serious factor in normal battles, so it only has an effect in dungeons. For two, although fatigue carries over from one battle to the next, fatigue accrues slowly (thanks to the easy battles) and it is extremely easy to recover fatigue with healing items. Fatigue isn't the fun novelty that dungeon exploration is, but neither is it a weight on the player. Shadows of Valentia also lacks the familiar weapon triangle that has been a staple of the series for years (although the weapon triangle was not in Gaiden either). This is another feature that can feel jarring to veteran players, especially since it is mostly noticeable on weaker units who no longer have the crutch of a small boost to hit rate. Aside from the fact that your units' hit rate will be lower than average for other games you'll probably forget about the lack of a weapon triangle after the first few maps. More interesting is the weapon system itself in Shadows of Valentia, where weapons are equipped as items and you can only have one at a time. Weapons don't break, and after a unit repeatedly uses a weapon they'll learn an art–a special attack. Arts are an interesting addition; they're not useful in every situation since you can't attack twice with the majority of them, but every so often you need just a little extra power to finish off an enemy and arts become a valuable asset. And since you can't carry multiple weapons like other games, arts can sometimes fill the role of a different weapon, like adding +1 to your attack range. The downside is you don't get to keep the art if you change weapons, but Shadows of Valentia does have a weapon forge so you can improve weapons to keep them useful. It's a new way of planning out how best to equip your army for a Fire Emblem game, and although equipping only one weapon seems more simple there is still a satisfying degree of forethought necessary. Another surprising quirk of Shadows of Valentia and Gaiden is that magic requires health to cast, and the more powerful the magic the more costly it is. At first this system sounds kind of crazy, especially for a strategy game where making sure you have just enough health to survive the enemy's turn can sometimes be crucial. It definitely adds another layer to how you lay your plans. Mages end up feeling particularly delicate, especially if their maximum health isn't high to begin with. But as with everything in Fire Emblem it's manageable with a little strategic planning, especially since there are several spells that have a range of 3, so it's easy to keep mages out of the line of fire. And more importantly, magical attacks are far too valuable in this game to recoil at the sight of a few lost hit points. Resistance seems to be the dump stat of choice for just about every enemy type–and your own characters as well–so a good mage is worth the calculated risk. Easily the most useful oddity of Shadows of Valentia is Mila's Turnwheel, a feature entirely unique to this game. Every Fire Emblem player has had a moment that they wish they could undo, whether it's a character's death, a bad level-up, or a rage-inducing miss despite a 92% chance to hit. If the result was truly unforgivable players would routinely restart the entire battle, sometimes losing an hour or more of time. With Mila's Turnwheel players can turn back time by a single move or more to correct these mistakes. This can be hugely valuable, though there's a limit on the number of uses you have in a single battle (or a single dungeon) which prevents it from being completely overpowered. Of course, die-hard traditionalists can just ignore it, but for players that don't mind the game taking a bit of pity on them a bad move no longer has to be a catastrophic one. Of course, not every preserved quirk of the original Gaiden is necessarily to Shadows of Valentia's credit. Most notably the map design is a bore. And not just in the sense of uninteresting designs or repetitive objectives (most are rout the enemy), but annoying designs such as huge fields with one funnel that requires you to slowly move characters through. Enemy armies aren't always the most interesting either, with small numbers and little variety. Battles within dungeons are perhaps understandably simple, but even many of the main story battles tend to be surprisingly uncomplex. There is a bit of a feeling of quantity over quality battles in Shadows of Valentia. That's not to say the game is easy. There are still challenging moments, and perhaps the biggest challenge is the abysmal growth rates of most characters, which really makes the lack of a weapon triangle sting. Hit percentages can seem almost comically low, oftentimes not worth the risk in a different Fire Emblem game. None of this makes Shadows of Valentia too frustrating per se, but overall the core map and battle design of Gaiden could have used a bit of an overhaul for this remake. It's a Fire Emblem game so there's nothing fancy to learn about the controls–just about the only noteworthy aspect is that the N3DS c-stick is useful for camera control while exploring dungeons. Speaking of N3DS, Shadows of Valentia also supports amiibo. Any amiibo can be used to summon a random ally for one turn, or a Fire Emblem amiibo can summon that specific character (i.e. a Marth amiibo summons Marth). The only problem is that summoning an ally not only costs Alm's or Celica's turn, it costs them 10HP. This has a weird catch-22 effect for amiibo usefulness: having an extra unit would be most beneficial in early maps, but those are the times when losing 10HP would be the biggest problem. Conversely, by the time that health isn't as much of a concern you probably wouldn't have much use for an amiibo fighter, especially at the expense of Alm or Celica attacking directly. amiibo rarely have a profound effect on any game anyway though so it's not a huge loss having the amiibo in this game be only quasi useful. More importantly, Shadows of Valentia released alongside its own amiibo, one for Alm and one for Celica. In addition to being quite nicely detailed the amiibo unlock bonus dungeons with challenging enemies that, once defeated, drop valuable items and weapons. On one hand it's a nice boon for anyone dedicated enough to buy yet more amiibo, but it still would have been nice if the bonus dungeons had been more like real dungeons, with twists and turns to explore. Instead these are pretty much just a series of battles, and although the rewards are great the dungeons are a bit bland. Finally we come to the visual and aural features of Shadows of Valentia which are, perhaps surprisingly, pretty great. Obviously there is not much room for visual design in a grid-based strategy game, and even the newly rendered 3D dungeons lack panache, but the character design in this game is beautiful. The colors have a blown out, softer style that gives the game a misty, ethereal look that is captivating. Perhaps it is simply the change of pace from the past two Fire Emblem games but the character art looks great, plus you get to see it more often since while you are in villages you can see full body portraits of random characters. And although there aren't many cutscenes they don't look half bad either, though they don't leave nearly as much of an impression. The game's visuals are complemented by a quality soundtrack and excellent voice work. Part of the charm of many of the characters comes from their lively voice acting which does a great job of bringing out their personalities. Fire Emblem Echoes: Shadows of Valentia straddles the line between old and new, creating an experience wholly unique and yet still recognizably Fire Emblem. The many quirks of Gaiden may still seem bizarre now, 25 years later, but they have a fun value in their own way, and are a good reminder that even beloved franchises deserve some wiggle room to experiment with new features. Speaking of which, the new features for this remake help keep the game accessible even to inexperienced players, and builds up on some of the areas where the original game was lacking. Outside of the unfortunate retention of uninspired map design Fire Emblem Echoes: Shadows of Valentia is a fantastic and fantastically unusual turn-based strategy adventure. Rating: 9 out of 10 Emblems
  22. https://kantopia.wordpress.com/2017/05/28/fire-emblem-awakening-nintendo-dream-first-year-anniversary-developer-interview-june-2013/ Some pretty interesting stuff.
  23. http://gematsu.com/2017/05/fire-emblem-warriors-adds-twin-original-protagonists-marth-chrom The next issue of Famitsu has the first new details on Fire Emblem Warriors, and from what we're able to take away from it so far, there's a lot of new info. Fire Emblem Warriors will tell the story of two new protagonists, Shion and Lian of the kingdom of Idris (names subject to change, presumably they're of royalty), which is engulfed in war. Legendary characters from the many different worlds of Fire Emblem appear to take up arms and join their cause, as we can see as Marth (from Fire Emblem: Shadow Dragon) here in contact with their world. The Hero-King himself wields of the Blade of Light, Falchion. Chrom (from Fire Emblem Awakening) is also teased in a silhouette earlier in the magazine feature, though his inclusion is nothing new since he was confirmed in the original trailer for the game. There's a lot of smaller info that gives more insight on what the game is like, from the article: Fire Emblem Warriors will release for Nintendo Switch and New Nintendo 3DS this fall.
  24. Apologies for the shit video quality. I don't have time to do a full let's play of the game right now, but I think it's really neat that I now own an English cart of FE6 that I can play on an actual handheld. If you guys want, I can try playing a bit further into the game to see if anything weird happens.
  25. http://www.metacritic.com/game/3ds/fire-emblem-echoes-shadows-of-valentia/critic-reviews http://www.gamerankings.com/3ds/204443-fire-emblem-echoes-shadows-of-valentia/index.html Critic reviews for Fire Emblem Echoes: Shadows of Valentia are in! Here are a couple of them, with more at the previous links. Gaming Nexus - 9.5/10 GameSpot - 9/10 Cubed3 - 9/10 Nintendo Life - 9/10 IGN - 7.8/10 Destructoid - 7.5/10 Fire Emblem Echoes: Shadows of Valentia will be released for Nintendo 3DS in North America and Europe on May 19.
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