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Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/21/21 in all areas

  1. Congrats on 5 years Ninfora. Not sure why but I felt like showing up. BTW hrt is incredible shit. Highly recommend.
    5 points
  2. I'm here for the party.
    5 points
  3. Oh shit y'all, Ninfora was 5 years old 2 days ago.
    4 points
  4. My hot take is that the N64 controller was never that well designed, and we only got accustomed to it because we were kids that had already fallen under Nintendo’s spell. I could almost never see myself playing with one of those again. The new buttons might help a bit though.
    3 points
  5. Kirby and the Forgotten Land looks to be up there with Pokemon Legends: Arceus and BOTW's sequel as a favorite to be my personal GOTY for 2022. That was the best new announcement from the Direct. The addition of Nintendo 64 games to the NSO service hopefully will at most cost $30, up $10 from the current year plan. If it's that price, I'll upgrade when the new tier launches and look forward to playing Ocarina of Time on the Switch as I have Super Mario 64 available already through Super Mario 3D All-Stars. Once it's added, the Switch might be the right system to experience Majora's Mask on for the first time. Bayonetta 3 is looking good and I'm excited for the release in spite of not yet being too into the current games. I still have to finish up the first game and then play Bayonetta 2. 2022 is shaping up to be a special year for the Nintendo Switch, like it's 2017 launch year. I'll say too that I'm glad that they are making the final Smash character reveal its own presentation. As fatigued on Smash news and speculation as I am, Ultimate deserves a Direct all on its own for its final character.
    3 points
  6. i wandered in late to the site so it's only fitting that i wander in late for the celebration wild that it's been four years already for me way more consistently active here than i ever was on NS1 or 2
    3 points
  7. I will be going into it with no expectations. It's better that way when something I don't expect happens.
    3 points
  8. Happy Autumnal Equinox my spooky friends! Have some modern, Fall-theme Zelda fanart!
    3 points
  9. 3 points
  10. got day drunk, dissociated and imagined a 3d kirby game, an actraiser remake and charlie day as luigi in some surrealist fever nightmare i'm glad none of that actually happened because it would signify the simulation falling apart
    2 points
  11. No real expectations because I don't expect to see anything in particular except for BoTW2. My predictions/what I'd like to see though... I'ma gonna play some Bingo today. 😁
    2 points
  12. No themes thought of as of yet, though with the Direct in a little over four hours from now there may be news that could spark a theme idea for tonight. Keep an eye out on chatter in here after the Direct, in case themes are tossed in for consideration.
    2 points
  13. lol selling the loose "rare" ones... 1. 3d print a mold of the rare ones 2. buy chocolate wafers, or hell, even oreo crumb ice cream topping. buy icing 3. press a few "rare" wafers 4. make knockoffs 5. profit
    2 points
  14. I read that as hrt is incredible shirt. And now I believe you need an HRT shirt.
    2 points
  15. Code Name: S.T.E.A.M.: Definitive Edition, let's go!
    2 points
  16. that seems a little heartless tbh :S antivaxxers seem crazy and unhinged but a lot of what they say isn't actually coming from total ignorance or lies. the medical industry does profit immensely from the average joe, from both ends of the spectrum - from very really sick to not actually sick at all, and we all know the american government is not known for its truthfulness. those very real thoughts and worries spiral people who have been or have watched loved ones been taken advantage of and puts them in these states of mind and then they spread it to others. covid can spread to any of us, and as time goes on i don't really think 'statistically' he WILL be fine, and that's scary to imagine when its someone you really care about. though, based on what you posted, ty, i don't really know how you would break through that mindset. a common theme now is antivaxxers laying dying in emergency rooms begging for the vax and finally realizing the weight of their choice. at most i think you can lead a horse to water, as they say. i hope your friend comes around and it doesn't end up biting him in the ass. compassion can only get you so far, but if you really care about him, that's really about all you can convey. could be worth bringing up previous vaccines and why we don't have things like the black plague anymore?
    2 points
  17. I personally never had a problem with the original Doom in that regard, but also I feel like a lot of people are coddled by maps or extremely linear level design because I'm a boomer.
    1 point
  18. I am in agreement but the only reason I think it was the way it was was because of the newness of 3D gaming.... put the Dpad to the far left in case 3D falls off so its not uncomfortable if the games get developed that way. But, given that its selling point was 3D with an analog stick and it did end up being the dominant directional method for just about every game on the system, it being in the center made it uncomfortable as hell to hold for intense/extended periods of time.
    1 point
  19. DLurkster

    Smash Saturdays: 10p

    I'm gonna say this now since everytime there's no Saturday Smash, there's an ask for Sunday night one. I do not do Sundays. Remember that.
    1 point
  20. Here's a game that needs no introduction. The most highly anticipated Zelda title in years, and the reason millions of people bought a Switch (though it's available on the Wii U as well). The Zelda game that would defy series conventions while also returning to the core element of the original title: freedom of exploration. The Zelda adventure that would trust players to experience however much or however little of the game's world that they chose. The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild is a bold move for a beloved franchise with thirty years of history, so it's all the more surprising to see the developers pull it off seemingly effortlessly. Breath of the Wild hits all the right notes to make Hyrule the sprawling, welcoming, challenging, and magical land that it has always been in the hearts of its fans. One of the many ways in which Breath of the Wild breaks convention with the Zelda franchise–and indeed many games in general–is its approach to storytelling. The game doesn't force you to progress through cutscene checkpoints to fill in all the details, nor is it devoid of plot like Mario platformer games. Instead you are free to discover the story at your own pace (after the prologue portion of the game that introduces the gameplay basics and the base plotline). This easily could have felt like an unwieldy way to tell a story, but Breath of the Wild manages it beautifully. This is largely because the heart of the story is in past events which you can learn about in varied locales around Hyrule, so seeing events out of order doesn't matter. In fact, unlocking these story moments at your own pace allows each player to see the story unfold in a unique way, which is rather brilliant. The emotional journey of the characters is still preserved no matter what order you progress in, and these brief glimpses of the characters only makes you eager to discover more. And there is plenty of depth to uncover, which only adds to the weight and tragedy of what happened prior to the events of the game. Even with this disjointed format and Link's typical silence, Breath of the Wild manages to tell one of the more emotionally affecting stories in the Zelda series. The leap to open-world gameplay might seem a bit odd at first, but once you start playing any apprehension melts away. In typical Nintendo fashion the basics seem familiar to other games in the genre, but soon enough you see the brilliant Nintendo touches that make Breath of the Wild stand out from any similar games. For one thing, freedom of exploration means true freedom here. Link can climb almost every surface you can see–there's no need to find the "correct" path up a mountain, you can scramble up sheer cliffs wherever you want (limited only by your stamina meter). This degree of freedom is intoxicating; it's easy to lose hours of your day simply exploring every nook and cranny that Hyrule has to offer. The truly incredible thing is that this never loses its charm. It is so satisfying to discover things in Breath of the Wild, even a small item like the numerous seeds hidden throughout the world. Indeed, one of the true joys in this game is discovering things at your own pace, from all-important shrines to new ways to battle enemies. And although this is the biggest map of Hyrule yet there is never a lack of things to find. There is a perfect balance of free space to roam and activities in which to participate, so you're always engaged with the game world. Let your feet take you where they may in Breath of the Wild and you'll never be disappointed. As mentioned Breath of the Wild's freedom isn't limited to exploration. Practically every time you defeat a group of enemies you'll find a different tactic that you could have used instead. The gameplay is incredibly varied, and while the direct approach works well there is a wonderful sense of satisfaction in taking on challenges with unconventional tactics. Be sure to engage with your environment when fighting enemies–you'll most likely discover new ways to play. The usual combat elements feel great in Breath of the Wild as well. It's not much more complicated than past Zelda games but it still rewards playing well–dodging at the right time and unleashing a flurry of blows is always satisfying. And the variety of weapons helps keep combat fresh from start to finish. Initially the concept of equipment breaking seems annoying but once you're playing it just keeps you constantly engaged with the world's weapon options, from swords and spears to boulders and steep cliffs. Different weapon types feel genuinely different, and you may just find yourself changing tactics depending upon the enemy you're currently facing. Though it still would have been nice if, once a weapon breaks, Link automatically switched to a new one in your inventory. Selecting a new weapon mid-battle does feel clumsy initially. Two important mainstays of the Zelda franchise have been reworked for Breath of the Wild: items and dungeons. After the prologue Link is equipped with all the items he needs–just four abilities. It's definitely shocking to see a change like this but after a few minutes in the game you'll forget all about it. Link's smaller selection of abilities only encourages the player to experiment and come up with unique solutions to the various challenges the game provides rather than cluttering up the inventory screen with items that are only used in their respective dungeons. Speaking of which, Breath of the Wild is virtually dungeon-less. The four main "dungeons" of this game are hardly dungeons at all, and are instead more like extended puzzle challenges. This is one area where Breath of the Wild might have gone a bit too far with changing the Zelda formula, though. These puzzles are decent but are a little too similar to one another with only modest senses of difficulty, including their boss fights–the absence of traditional dungeons with varied puzzles and combat scenarios is keenly felt. Such massive, engaging temples or caves would not have necessarily felt out of place in this version of Hyrule either. Incidentally the final portion of the game, before the climactic fight, is the one area of the adventure most aligned with a traditional dungeon, and it's one of the best parts of the game–it manages to combine Breath of the Wild's philosophy of freedom with a slightly more intricate environment to explore. The other key dungeons of the game could have used a bit of that blend as well. Breath of the Wild makes up for its limited dungeons with over one hundred shrines which are shorter, themed puzzle or combat challenges. Shrines exemplify the incredible gameplay variety that the developers were free to incorporate into the game, not just for the challenges within shrines but for finding the shrines as well. Many can be spotted while exploring, others have a specific side quest tied to them, and some are a challenge just to reach and instead incorporate environmental puzzles. Not all of the shrines are particularly difficult, and the ones that rely upon motion control can be a little annoying, but the flexibility with which you can approach shrine puzzles and shrine hunting is one of the many joys of Breath of the Wild's philosophy of allowing players to experience the game in their own ways. As far as controls are concerned Breath of the Wild doesn't try to reinvent the wheel. Although there are a lot of controls to keep in mind, a few hours of game time will make all of Link's abilities feel familiar. And while the motion controlled puzzles in shrines can be awkward the other gyro controls are fairly comfortable. Most notably aiming the bow with motion controls can be quite helpful for making slight adjustments to perfectly line up a shot. You can always turn motion controlled aiming off if it's not helping though. The visuals of Breath of the Wild are stunning. The colors are beautifully vibrant and, consistent with the free-flowing open-world nature of the gameplay, there are no harsh outlines around objects. The very graphics of the game flow together, emphasizing the unbroken energy of the entire adventure. Each region of the game has a distinct visual personality, from the snowy mountaintops to the sandy beaches, but the overall style is still consistent with one sprawling world. The scenery is simply gorgeous, and you can't help but pause now and then to appreciate it. The music of the game is beautiful in its own right, and provides a soft, muted, ambient soundtrack for much of the adventure. In fact that ambient music could have been just a bit more forceful, more prominent in the game, as outside of the main theme there are few particularly memorable tracks. Longtime fans will enjoy hearing the musical influences of past Zelda games though, which is a nice treat. And finally, a first for the series, Breath of the Wild includes voice acting. The voice work fits perfectly with the rest of the game, though it's a shame it's only in important cutscenes. The actors did a great job of bringing out the personality and emotions of each character, and it would have been fun to see that in the more goofy and charming characters that you tend to meet in side quests. Perhaps not surprisingly such a vast game has the occasional technical hiccup while playing. Most common are frame rate drops during visually intensive scenes, like having a big fight in the middle of a dense forest area. At times the entire game pauses for a split second as it struggles to keep up with the action. There have been various explanations for these issues but the bottom line is that they do pop up sporadically and can be annoying to see but never actually hinder gameplay. The length of the game is hard to pin down: it can so easily vary from one person to the next, and I don't just mean speed runs that try to finish the game in one hour. Granted there are a ton of collectibles to find which affects the completion percentage you can see once you've beaten the story but even so, Breath of the Wild is an incredibly content-rich game. The biggest challenge of the entire game is finding the willpower to take a break from playing. There's always something else to do here, from the main story to simply gathering ingredients and cooking up a few stat boosting meals, and every single moment of it is a blast. The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild is a masterpiece. There's simply no other word for it. The game is a masterpiece, an unparalleled experience that draws players into a sprawling adventure with just enough familiarity to keep it accessible. Exploration has never been so free or so rewarding. This wildly different direction for a Zelda game was a gamble that paid off in a huge way, though that's not to discount all the various pieces that come together to make Breath of the Wild so incredible. The depth of the emotional journey for the characters further brought to life by quality voice acting, the beautiful visuals that invite you to explore, the captivating soundtrack–every element of Breath of the Wild combines perfectly into a truly magnificent piece of video game art. Maybe there is one other word to describe it: breathtaking. Rating: 10 out of 10 Korok Seeds
    1 point
  21. Bruh, what?!? and how?!? Yes backlog but still how?!? You need to get on this and not to add more to your plate; that DLC expansion you also need to play as well. It makes the single player aspect in this game ask; I am a joke to you? I don't care what you need to do, if you or your brother have spare gold coins buy that DLC. Ya, don't have to complete off the bat just buy it. Ya, just need 2000 coins to get, unless you were saving those coins for something if not.....
    1 point
  22. IMO, a good thought-provoking video about pricing, tiers, and other systems .... ****** ****** My own thoughts: NO WAY this is more than $20 extra / $40 total Arguing it should only be at most $10 more They are going to need more features added as well.... was the bluetooth audio update a hint at full voice coming? --More free full trials? --Messaging system? I mean if they could do this on the Wii.... (man I miss the glowing blue light) Really need an upgrade to servers/service.... if you pay more there is the expectation the connectivity will be better/smoother Where were the GB/GBC/GBA rumors With Genesis coming.... SMS? TG16? Neo Geo?
    1 point
  23. It's funny when this game was first revealed at Square Enix E3 this past June I had mixed hype and mixed expectations of this game. Some said it didn't need that long segment, others wanted more from the gameplay and most just hope it wouldn't be another Marvel Avenger situation. I was definitely in that camp tho I never bought the game, thank goodness. Here comes this hands-on preview of this game from IGN and what is said more than shown has me a little more hopeful that this game can live up to what ppl might expect from a Guaurdian of the Galaxy, whatever that is. I am just gonna leave there for those who seem interested or on the fence watch this vid and see if gonna get this game or not bother.
    1 point
  24. Aside from a little taste of the franchise with Travis Strikes Again two years ago, fans have been waiting a decade for another mainline entry in the No More Heroes series. With creator Suda51's signature sense of outlandish style, No More Heroes III reunites fans with Travis Touchdown, Sylvia Christel, Shinobu and more, along with a whole new collection of enemies to slaughter as Travis once again wields his beam katana on a bloody path of destruction. Perhaps even more than previous entries, No More Heroes III is set to polarize players between those that love Suda51's insane game design and those that want a more conventional action-adventure. Whichever camp you ultimately fall into though, there's no denying that this is a hell of a ride. The game opens with an E.T. style prologue where a young boy discovers a small alien on Earth and helps send him back into space. Twenty years later, that alien returns fully grown and ready to conquer the planet with an army of alien "superheroes." Travis Touchdown once again takes up his beam katana to stop them, though he must rise through the ranks of the top ten Galactic Superhero Rankings before he can take on the leader. It's an insane, bizarre story filled with Suda51's signature charm. Travis regularly breaks the fourth wall to talk about what gamers like and don't like, and the writing is littered with pop culture references and seeming nonsequiturs. Plot points jump around so quickly that oftentimes you'll be left wondering what just happened, but overall it works when you just let yourself go along with the crazy flow of things. That said, it definitely feels like No More Heroes III turns the crazy up to eleven, and even with that in mind it can be jarring at times. The previous games were plenty crazy in their own right, but still had some sense of narrative structure. This game gets so out there at times by introducing and rapidly dropping concepts that it doesn't always quite stick the landing into a satisfying conclusion. Like the previous games, No More Heroes III is a third-person action game with a relatively simple overworld to explore and minigame side jobs to tackle. Fighting with the beam katana feels great. Travis tears through enemies with flashy panache and it's always satisfying to execute a finishing blow or defeat an enemy with a pro wrestling throw. Travis can also use four Death Glove skills to mix up the action further, and you can customize your glove with skill chip buffs such as increased heavy attack power or extra time to counterattack when you execute a perfect dodge. Combat looks wild but it's ultimately pretty easy to pick up and learn, and you'll have a blast dodging enemies and stunning them into a suplex finisher. In some ways it feels like combat has been simplified and it does get a bit repetitive at times, but then again the series was never about memorizing elaborate attack combos so much as the satisfaction of ripping apart enemies with bloody attacks. You'll need to take on a handful of designated matches before you can challenge another boss, but aside from fighting you might also want to occupy your time with side job minigames to earn money and skill points. Like previous games these minigames are intentionally ridiculous—one has you picking up trash in alligator-infested waters while another is literally just mowing the lawn—and having something else to do to break up the action is nice. The downside is that there are only a handful of minigame types that are repeated several times. More variety and particularly more personality in the minigames would have been great. In fact, that is, surprisingly, one of the major faults of No More Heroes III—the environments, the alien bosses, and even the basic missions and minigames don't have as much personality as previous games. The bosses in particular are a bit disappointing. Although each fight is preceded by a short cutscene or two to introduce the characters, they just didn't have that much impact, which is a shame. The assassins of the first No More Heroes game were a bit more grounded and were better for it. In No More Heroes III, the alien "superheroes" are outlandish and so sometimes come off as inconsequential. The battles themselves regularly defy expectations, but I only found myself engaged with some of the alien characters. No More Heroes III is a good fifteen or twenty hours long, depending on how much time you spend on the more repetitive aspects. You do have to dive into them at least a little to earn money for the next boss fight, but thankfully it never feels very grindy. If you want to explore everything the game has to offer though you'll have to settle for these optional battles and mini-games, or taking on a higher difficulty level—there aren't really significant options to change up the gameplay in the post-game or new game+ features. As mentioned the combat is beautifully stylish, sometimes edging on over-designed but still just cool to look at. The colorful yet eclectic art style just works for No More Heroes III—the game oozes style and weirdness in equal parts. The boss designs are unique and flashy, though again don't have quite the same personality as previous games' bosses, but I can at least say that every boss fight is a visual spectacle. The constant pop-in while you're riding around town on Travis's bike is annoying but ultimately doesn't hurt the gameplay. The soundtrack is solid even if there are only a few standout tracks, and the voice work does a fine job of bringing these crazy characters to life. No More Heroes III is exactly what players should expect from a Suda51 game: it's absurd, wild, often confusing, and undeniably stylish. When you're in the thick of combat and especially when facing off against an alien boss, it's a blast to hack and slash away with the beam katana. The game can also vary wildly from those highs to unpolished lows when it comes to minigames or environment design, and occasionally the insanity goes so far off the rails that it's hard to appreciate. Still, No More Heroes fans should enjoy the adventure despite, or perhaps because of, all of the madness. Rating: 8 out of 10 Superheroes
    1 point
  25. I seen that. Now, the thing is of course you have to be NSO member to buy these of Nintendo but how does that work to buy a controller from another region? Controller are not region locked so that is not issue. I think what it comes down to like making Japanese eShop account, you must use that log into MyNintendo and purchase it there, where another hiccup is the address. It's been a while but I can't recall if I put address for my JPN account on Switch. I'll check that in the coming day to probably prepare if it is manageable to purchase the mega drive controller. I will definitely try.
    1 point
  26. Loved the Direct. 3D Kirby looks awesome, and I'm all in on that. A nice teaser on the HW DLC. More Mario Golf courses. Couldn't care about Metroid Dread as it's two weeks out and I'm buying it then. Splatoon 3 is mega hype. The N64/Genesis being added.... I was happy until they said "new plan". There's not really enough NES/SNES on there or new additions as it is. I don't feel like they should start charging extra for these additions.... I keep coasting on free trials of GamePass for XB that I get with new games, and there's SO. MUCH. that comes with that, The Mario movie is going to be absolutely terrible. I have ZERO expectations of it being any good in the slightest. HOWEVER. It will absolutely be entertaining as hell, so I'm looking forward to it.
    1 point
  27. yea i've already seen plenty of estradiol molecular pins and tattoos so i'm sure somebody has it on a shirt seen a couple for t as well
    1 point
  28. I had some rather strong feelings upon seeing that Martinet wasn't given Mario... But hey, at least the part went to Chris Pratt. He could really use the resume booster. I already can't look at Star Lord without seeing Andy Dwyer. Maybe it's just me, but I can't get immersed when the actor is more prominent than the character they're playing.
    1 point
  29. Same here that the direct was okay...for me it was like 7/10 and that is even with the positive of the new NSO platforms to play. I am not even taking away that it will cost more. I and most expected. We just have to wait like everyone else what's the charge. Tho I am annoyed like you, like most I renewed my subscription for the year a few weeks ago. The timing was bad but when were they gonna announce this?!? I don't think there would of been a good time tbh.
    1 point
  30. Charlie Day as Luigi? OK, that might be interesting...
    1 point
  31. 1 point
  32. @DLurkster that's very strange indeed. I haven't heard of any further reports, but I will look closer. I'll be updating a few things this weekend that should fix a few miscellaneous bugs as well. Please let me know if it recurs any time after that.
    1 point
  33. Yes. Several of my trans friends should have this in fact lol.
    1 point
  34. Spoiler depends on the person. I'm super stickler on Zelda spoilers, to the point I don't like hearing rumours of "leaks" on Zelda stuff. But basically anything not yet officially announced or revealed is a spoiler. Regards to a Direct, saying "Pokemon Diamond Remake will be shown" isn't really a spoiler, but maybe someone who doesn't want to know ANYTHING that will be shown in the Direct might consider it one. Saying "Platinum Games confirmed to announce title during Direct" is kind of a spoiler, even though not specific, people can determine the likelihood of which IP gets announced and it might take away from the surprise of experiencing it on their own. Edit: Other media, most people seem to do: -TV shows - One week after release, unless a full season is released at once, then it's movie rules -Movies - One month after release -Books - Three months after release -Games - 6 months to a year It's sort of like a "reasonable amount of time to enjoy it on yourself" where some take longer than others to complete.
    1 point
  35. For the MK Tournament Nights Squad. The only expectation I'm going in with is...
    1 point
  36. Time flies! Happy 5th anniversary Ninfora and here's to many more.
    1 point
  37. There’s still the ONE. FIGHTER. lEFT. … Crash?
    1 point
  38. I recently found this... I have fond memories reading this thing in a beach house my family rented, when I went to the beach with my family in 2001. This was just after I got my glacier blue GBA, with Tony Hawk's Pro Skater 2 the Summer the GBA launched. Not long after that, I got Super Mario Advance.
    1 point
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